counseling

Getting to Know Change, Inc.: Counselor Christina Warden

Posted by on Sep 6, 2017 in change inc, christina warden, counseling, getting to know change inc, St. Louis Counseling | Comments Off on Getting to Know Change, Inc.: Counselor Christina Warden

Getting to Know Change, Inc.: Counselor Christina Warden

As we’ve mentioned previously, counselors are often portrayed in films and on television as distant and aloof, or even cold and sterile — the disapproving old man stroking his bear and saying little more than, “Hmmmmm….” while clients pour their hearts out.  On the other hand, they are also portrayed as bumbling and naive, wanting to be helpful but only loosely oriented to reality themselves, sort of like the counselor version of Barney Fife or Homer Simpson. Neither of these is accurate.  At Change, Inc., we strive to create an environment which...

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On Being a Client: Guideposts for a Smooth Counseling Experience

Posted by on Aug 8, 2017 in counseling, jeffrey kottler, ryan neace, Ryan Thomas Neace, St. Louis Counseling, tips for success, what to expect in counseling | Comments Off on On Being a Client: Guideposts for a Smooth Counseling Experience

On Being a Client: Guideposts for a Smooth Counseling Experience

Most clients are initially nervous about counseling.  Some even report that they still feel lost mid-way through.  And frankly, why wouldn’t you?  Counseling is a somewhat mysterious process both in its nature, and in the notion that there simply isn’t a lot written for clients about what they should expect.   Reinforcing that notion in his book, On Being a Therapist, Dr. Jeffrey Kottler remarks the following, in the section entitled, “On Being a Client: How to Get the Most from Therapy”: “Let’s acknowledge at the outset that [counseling] is a pretty strange enterprise. You sit...

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Caring For Yourself Through Grief: 7 Tips

Posted by on Oct 6, 2016 in counseling, grief, St. Louis Counseling, thriveworks | Comments Off on Caring For Yourself Through Grief: 7 Tips

Caring For Yourself Through Grief: 7 Tips

When we suffer a loss, all of a sudden a million things demand our attention: making arrangements, handling business, making sure the children are ok and dealing with our own feelings of grief and loss. It’s easy during these stressful times to forget to take care of ourselves. We may think we’re doing fine because we are still getting through the day. Suffering a loss is one of the most emotionally intense experiences we will ever face. Grief affects us emotionally, physically, spiritually, mentally and socially. Your strength will be called upon and challenged in the coming days and weeks....

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Therapists Get Depressed Too?

Posted by on Sep 21, 2016 in befriending pain, change, change inc, counseling, depression, ryan neace, Ryan Thomas Neace, St. Louis Counseling, therapist's inner life | Comments Off on Therapists Get Depressed Too?

Therapists Get Depressed Too?

I’ve been a little depressed lately.
Wait…did I say that out loud?
Doesn’t matter. It’s true either way. That’s right. I’m a therapist, and I’ve been depressed lately. It’s actually remarkable how predictable this sort of thing is for me.

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Change, Inc. in the News!

Posted by on Jul 14, 2016 in change inc, counseling, online behavior, relationships, ryan neace, Ryan Thomas Neace, social media | Comments Off on Change, Inc. in the News!

Change, Inc. in the News!

Did you see us in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch this week?  We were there!  Change, Inc. Founder and Clinical and Managing Director, Ryan Thomas Neace, was featured in an article discussing the impact of online behavior in relationships!  Click here to read!

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Positive Thinking or Plain Ol’ Denial?

Posted by on Jun 13, 2016 in change, change inc, counseling, denial, expectations, positive thinking, ryan neace, Ryan Thomas Neace, St. Louis Counseling, thinking positively, tips for success | Comments Off on Positive Thinking or Plain Ol’ Denial?

Positive Thinking or Plain Ol’ Denial?

Thinking positively about the people in our lives acknowledges that they have flaws and faults which may have an impact on us, and allows us to make informed decisions about how to interact while still choosing to think of them positively. We do this by learning to expect nothing more than what they are capable of, and allowing ourselves the privilege of feeling warmly toward them about that helpful portion, however small it may be. There is no need for anger or frustration about the rest — we no longer expect it of them and trust them to be who they are (even if that means we...

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